Core Fitness overview

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For anyone looking for a class that involves working out, calming the mind and learning about topics like nutrition and fitness, look no further than Core Fitness. Core Fitness is a semester-long class that involves yoga, pilates, meditation, rest & relaxation, speed & agility, high intensity interval training, flexibility and core exercises. With an estimated 100 students a semester, this class is a popular choice for students who are in need of fulfilling a physical education requirement or simply enjoy exercising. 

Throughout the semester, students are able to improve their core strength and flexibility while exercising their minds through yoga and breathing exercises. Taught by Coach Lori Rembe, Core Fitness is a way to get both exercise and relaxation during the school day.

“Core Fitness is about the individual as a whole as it’s a total well being class,” Coach Rembe said. “Yes, we do physical work, but we also focus on other components, like self-awareness, mental awareness, mental training techniques & concepts, how to calm the anxious mind, breathing techniques and emotional fitness along with nutrition and environmental awareness.”

Not only does the class cover physical activities, but students also learn about life topics. The class is composed of seven units – Foundations, Anatomy & Heart Health, Personal Fitness, Core Fitness, Global Footprint and two Nutrition Units. This allows students enrolled to explore information such as fitness vocabulary, mental health, nutrition, caloric intake, character traits, goal setting, the environment, muscle anatomy and more.

“[My favorite part of Core Fitness] are the restoration days because we get to relax which de-stresses me from the day,” senior Kylie Sacks said. “[So far, my favorite unit has been] anatomy and heart health because the information was great.”

Core Fitness students also get tested three times per semester on their flexibility, mile time, sit-ups and push-ups through FitnessGRAM. According to FitnessGRAM’s website, “The Cooper Institute developed the FitnessGram assessment to measure student physical fitness levels.” This allows students and their teachers to receive feedback on how the student is progressing fitness-wise without forcing intense exercise. 

Overall, the class aims “to increase daily participation in health enhancing physical activities and empower students to adopt a healthy and active lifestyle through personal fitness and health education,” as stated by the syllabus. It allows students to achieve credit for physical education without taking hard-core classes like Strength and Conditioning while learning and working towards goals at the same time.

“I want my students to feel comfortable in my class regardless of their fitness background.  It’s about learning how to use their own body weight as they exercise and having fun with exercise. I believe we have a good balance [between activities like core workouts, yoga, documentaries and speed/agility training] during the week which keeps everyone engaged and eager to participate,” Coach Rembe said. “I enjoy seeing students learn new techniques, progress in their fitness journey and reach their personal short term fitness/health goals.”

Coach Rembe’s Core Fitness class participates in a core workout which includes doing exercises such as planks, Russian twists and push-ups with short breaks in between each exercise. (Photo/Zoe Horwitz) 

Zoe Horwitz, an incoming freshman at American Heritage School in Plantation, Florida, is starting her first year as a writer for the Patriot Post. Besides reading and writing, Zoe spends her time tutoring younger students, playing with her dog, or watching “Legally Blonde.” She also enjoys playing lacrosse, as she plays for a club team and will be trying out for the American Heritage team later in the year. Zoe is very excited to be contributing to the Patriot Post.

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